Workshop in the Broads

Lake BESS research on the importance of water connectivity for healthy shallow lakes in the Upper Lough Erne, Northern Ireland and in the Broads, England, was presented to the Broads stakeholders yesterday. The event hosted by the Broads Authority.

This was an opportunity to discuss how our research will be translated into actions in the Broads where multiple major restoration projects are happening.

Carl Sayer gave an inspirational talk comparing the lake ecology and aquatic vegetation of the Upper Lough Erne region and The Broads.

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Workshop Announcement: Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services in Upper Lough Erne’s satellite lakes

We are organising two events in Northern Ireland to share our results with local stakeholders.

  • A workshop Tuesday November 24th 2015, from 6:45pm at Waterway Ireland HQ,  Enniskillen, Co Fermanagh.
  • A lunch time seminar Wednesday November 25th 2015, 12.30 – 13.30, NIEA HQ,  Belfast.

For both events there will be a presentation of our results and plenty of time for Q&As and discussion.

We would like to share our research findings with local stakeholders working on and around Upper Lough Erne’s satellite lakes so our research can be useful to those most concerned.

Please let us know if you would like to come by email: ambroise.baker [ at] ucl.ac.uk or with a message at the bottom of this page; and do not hesitate to forward this invitation to anyone you think could be interested.

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Lake BESS to present results: 100th Ecological Society of America annual meeting, Baltimore, USA

Lake BESS is looking forward to going to the 100th Ecological Society of America (ESA) annual meeting in Baltimore! We have a talk scheduled Friday August 14th 2015 during the session “COS 142: Habitat Structure, Fragmentation, Connectivity”.logo

This is a very exciting opportunity to present our work asking the question: Does connectivity increase resilience of biodiversity against eutrophication in networks of shallow lakes? Our talk will be the only one focusing on freshwater in an collection of oral papers otherwise dedicated to ecological connectivity.

We will be using aquatic plant surveys conducted between 1983 and 2014 in our two study areas: The Broads, England, UK, and the Upper Lough Erne area, Northern Ireland, UK, and we will identify the relative importance of:

  • connectivity between lakes,
  • local water chemistry
  • lake morphology
  • and other factors

to explain the aquatic vegetation patters in the two lake districts during two time periods.

The comprehensive programme of the conference is available here online program and our abstract can be read there.

Norfolk Pond Project

This post highlights another project Carl Sayer, Lake BESS’s principal investigator, is involved with: The Norfolk Pond Project. Ponds sustain a major share of freshwater diversity yet they have been subjected to near-systematic destruction, pollution or abandonment since WWII.

After years of neglect by conservation and research compared to other habitats, ponds are finally being incorporated into UK aquatic conservation approaches and the Norfolk Pond Project is an excellent example:

“Norfolk holds more ponds than any other English county with an estimated 23,000 ponds present. Most of these ponds are located in farmland, and have their origins as marl or clay pits and in some cases livestock-watering ponds dug in the 17th to 19th centuries. “

Sayers_Black_Pit1_June_2013“In addition the Brecks, west Norfolk and sites north of Norwich are home to some of the most amazingly diverse ancient ponds in the UK, pingos – ponds that occupy ice depressions formed during the last great ice age. A great place to see pingos is at Norfolk Wildlife Trust’s nature reserve, Thompson Common.”

“The Norfolk Ponds Project aims to reverse the decline of Norfolk’s ponds so that agricultural landscapes contain a mosaic of clean water ponds with fewer ponds overgrown by trees and bushes.” Read the leaflet for more information on this exciting new project!

Thanks to Carl for providing all the material for this post.

Back from the field!

We’re just back from our very successful field work around the Upper Lough Erne, Co. Fermanagh, Northern Ireland. We managed to survey nearly 20 satellite loughs for aquatic plants, water chemistry and bryozoans (see this previous post).

Corracoach Lough

Access to some of the lough was sometimes tough but always rewarding. Photography by Helen Bennion.

The help we received from volunteers and project partners was absolutely tremendous! Over the two week we have been a dozen of us actively involved in this research campaign. We’d particularly like to thank Hannah, Robert, Tim and Stephen for joining our team at this occasion and also all the land owners who were kind enough to grant us access to the lakes we had targeted.

Battling through reed beds to get onto some of the lough with our boats was one of the striking aspects of this field work! But it was worth the effort and the diversity of aquatic plant observed over the two week is very impressive. For instance we have sightings for at least ten different Potamogeton species (see this previous post), an extremely good score!

We’ll post more picture and reports from this field work in the coming weeks.

P. perfoliatus

Potamogeton perfoliatus (Photograph by Ben Goldsmith)

Pondweeds

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Pondweeds

The islands of Britain and Ireland have over 40 species or hybrids of pondweeds (genus Potamogeton). This diversity in pondweed is one of the highest in Europe with most European species being represented. Unfortunately local diversity and abundance of pondweeds have declined over the 20th Century, as a result of habitat destruction and pollution. The Upper Lough Erne region and The Broads are two areas of importance for the conservation of pondweed – but “what can we learn from these strongholds?” and “what measure could enhance their recovery nationally?” are questions we are trying to address part of the Lake BESS project. (Photo by Ambroise Baker: P. polygonifolius in full bloom).