Lake Connectivity, Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services: Workshop in the Broads

We are inviting any interested Broads stakeholder to take part to our workshop on Lake Connectivity, Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services in the Broads, England.

  • Thursday January 7th 2016 at the Broads Authority head quarters, from 11:30.

At this occasion, we would like to share the findings of our Lake BESS research project and we will have a special focus on the Broads. We are keen to share our work with local stakeholders working on and around lakes in the area so our research can be useful to anyone concerned.

Please get in touch for further details and to register – go to the bottom of this page and send us a message or ambroise.baker [at] ucl.ac.uk

oulton Broad_aerial

Aerial phtograph of Oulton broad by Mike Page http://mike-page.co.uk/

Workshop and Seminar about Upper Lough Erne’s satellite lakes

Following the previous post, this is just to let you know that our trip to Northern Ireland was very successful. It gave us a chance to discuss our research results with many partners, stakeholders and members of the public. The interest we met makes us hope that our research will find direct applications on the ground.

We would like to thank the many people who made this trip possible at the Fermanagh and Omagh District Council, Waterways Ireland, the Northern Ireland Environmental Agency and Queen’s University Belfast.

Fermanagh is the happiest place in the UK!

The BBC reported today that Fermanagh is the happiest place in the UK according to a recent survey by the ONS. Is there a link with the exceptional freshwater biodiversity levels we found during our work in the Upper Lough Erne region, part of Co. Fermanagh? Our Lake BESS work is only a preliminary step towards answering such fundamental question: a whole new research agenda lies ahead of us to better understand the value of nature and ecosystems in what is often referred to as coupled human-environment systems.

IMGP3047

Norfolk Pond Project

This post highlights another project Carl Sayer, Lake BESS’s principal investigator, is involved with: The Norfolk Pond Project. Ponds sustain a major share of freshwater diversity yet they have been subjected to near-systematic destruction, pollution or abandonment since WWII.

After years of neglect by conservation and research compared to other habitats, ponds are finally being incorporated into UK aquatic conservation approaches and the Norfolk Pond Project is an excellent example:

“Norfolk holds more ponds than any other English county with an estimated 23,000 ponds present. Most of these ponds are located in farmland, and have their origins as marl or clay pits and in some cases livestock-watering ponds dug in the 17th to 19th centuries. “

Sayers_Black_Pit1_June_2013“In addition the Brecks, west Norfolk and sites north of Norwich are home to some of the most amazingly diverse ancient ponds in the UK, pingos – ponds that occupy ice depressions formed during the last great ice age. A great place to see pingos is at Norfolk Wildlife Trust’s nature reserve, Thompson Common.”

“The Norfolk Ponds Project aims to reverse the decline of Norfolk’s ponds so that agricultural landscapes contain a mosaic of clean water ponds with fewer ponds overgrown by trees and bushes.” Read the leaflet for more information on this exciting new project!

Thanks to Carl for providing all the material for this post.

Understanding resilience, thresholds and tipping points: BESS Workshop, June 18-19, London

In a collaboration with Adrian Newton’s team in Bournemouth (BESS project on “Dynamics and Thresholds of Ecosystem Services in Wooded Landscapes”), Lake BESS is co-organising a BESS-funded workshop on resilience to take place June 18-19 in London.

There is more information about the workshop and how BESS people can take part here.

This will be a unique occasion to develop ideas around resilience, biodiversity and ecosystem services and a good chance to network with like-minded people who think resilience is an important notion to better communicate our science.

UK and Ireland Lakes Network conference 4th-5th March 2015

The UK and Ireland Lakes Network meeting was taking place in Abergavenny, South Wales, yesterday and the day before. This was a great opportunity for Lake BESS to meet other people working with lakes, hear about their activities and introduce our research.

In addition to many inspirational talks, we got very insightful feedback regarding our research project, following Ambroise Baker’s presentation. Thank you to Catherine Duigan from Natural Resources Wales for sharing this picture tweeted during the conference.

B_RVSyeW8AExBObOn Thursday morning, we visited the beautiful Llangors Lake, the largest natural lakes in South Wales. A fab occasion to network away while enjoying the great outdoors!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThank you to the UK and Ireland Lakes Network and to Natural Resources Wales for organising this conference and giving us a chance to present our work.

Lake BESS meeting

It has been a very busy summer and autumn for Lake BESS hence a reduction in post on this website. Lake BESS 2014 activities culminated in a meeting in UCL attended by most of us. We had a special guest, Geoff Philips, now honorary fellow at Stirling University, who is bringing exceptional expertise in water chemistry and in the functioning of the Broads system. He was also the only one of us remembering to take a picture! – thank you Geoff for coming and for sharing this picture:

photo-1

Back from the field!

We’re just back from our very successful field work around the Upper Lough Erne, Co. Fermanagh, Northern Ireland. We managed to survey nearly 20 satellite loughs for aquatic plants, water chemistry and bryozoans (see this previous post).

Corracoach Lough

Access to some of the lough was sometimes tough but always rewarding. Photography by Helen Bennion.

The help we received from volunteers and project partners was absolutely tremendous! Over the two week we have been a dozen of us actively involved in this research campaign. We’d particularly like to thank Hannah, Robert, Tim and Stephen for joining our team at this occasion and also all the land owners who were kind enough to grant us access to the lakes we had targeted.

Battling through reed beds to get onto some of the lough with our boats was one of the striking aspects of this field work! But it was worth the effort and the diversity of aquatic plant observed over the two week is very impressive. For instance we have sightings for at least ten different Potamogeton species (see this previous post), an extremely good score!

We’ll post more picture and reports from this field work in the coming weeks.

P. perfoliatus

Potamogeton perfoliatus (Photograph by Ben Goldsmith)

How do bryozoans travel?

‘How do bryozoans travel?’ is one of the questions we are going to address within our project. Beth Okamura is telling more about this aspect of our work:

“This summer we are planning to collect dormant propagules called statoblasts that are produced by freshwater bryozoans (see what bryozoans are on wikipedia). We will focus on the spined statoblasts produced by the lovely Cristatella mucedo.

Picture1

According to the Victorian naturalist George Allman , whose classic figure of Cristatella appears above, “a more interesting and beautiful animal than […] Cristatella mucedo can scarcely be imagined” (Allman 1856), an opinion that at least one of us adheres to – guess who! (ed. note: Beth is world-leading expert on Bryozoan, see her profile at the Natural History Museum).

Allman’s figure depicts a colony of Cristatella with various tentacular crowns (each about 1 mm) raised in filter feeding, the entire colony being drooped over and encircling aquatic vegetation. The figure also shows the spined statoblasts (also about 1 mm) in various developmental stages.

Statoblasts of Cristatella become attached to waterfowl (facilitated by their spines) and also, being buoyant, they initially float.

We aim to bolster our BESS project by examining relative levels of gene flow between Cristatella populations in sites associated with the Lough Erne and the Norfolk Broads systems, hypothesising that gene flow will be greater amongst sites in the more highly connected Lough Erne system.

The work is in collaboration with Hanna Hartikainen at ETH, Zurich.”

 

Link

8th Shallow Lakes Conference

This conference will take place October 12 – 17, 2014 in Antalya, Turkey and anyone with an interest in shallow lake ecosystems is invited to take part. There will be several famous researchers presenting their work, such as John Smol from Queen’s Univerity (Canada) and Luc De Meester from the Univerity of Leuven (Belgium), poster sessions and field excursions.